How to Win Employment Retaliation Claims in Pennsylvania

A Comprehensive Workplace Retaliation Guide

How to Win Employment Retaliation Claims in Pennsylvania

Retaliation at work is a serious issue that can result in negative consequences for the victim, such as loss of employment, reduced job responsibilities, harassment, and discrimination. Fortunately, employees who are retaliated against can seek legal recourse by filing a retaliation claim. This article provides an in-depth guide on how to win retaliation claims in Pennsylvania, focusing on the legal causes of action and dovetailing with whistleblowing. MKO Employment Law LLC is a top law firm that provides legal services to individuals who have experienced retaliation at work.

Retaliation at Work Retaliation Law at a Glance

Definition of Retaliation

Retaliation is any adverse action taken by an employer against an employee in response to a protected activity. Adverse actions can include termination, demotion, reduction in pay, negative performance reviews, exclusion from important meetings, denial of promotions, reassignment to a less desirable position, and others. The adverse action must be motivated by the employee’s protected activity, and not by a legitimate business reason. Retaliation can be difficult to prove, and employees who believe they have been retaliated against should seek the assistance of a knowledgeable employment law attorney.

Protected Activities

Protected activities are actions that are protected by law. Protected activities include reporting discrimination, harassment, safety violations, wage and hour violations, environmental violations, and other illegal or unethical conduct. In order to be protected, the activity must be based on a good faith belief that the conduct is illegal or unethical. Employees who engage in protected activities are protected from retaliation by law, and employers who retaliate against employees can be subject to penalties, including monetary damages and injunctive relief.

Causes of Action

Causes of action are the legal theories that employees may use to bring a claim for retaliation. Causes of action include the Pennsylvania Human Relations Act, Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, and the Whistleblower Law. Each cause of action has its own requirements and procedures, and employees should seek the advice of an experienced employment law attorney to determine which cause of action is most appropriate for their situation.

Burden of Proof

Employees who bring a claim for retaliation must prove that their employer took adverse action against them because of a protected activity. To prove retaliation, an employee must show that the employer knew about the protected activity, took an adverse action against the employee, and the adverse action was motivated by the protected activity. This can be difficult to prove, and employees who believe they have been retaliated against should seek the assistance of a knowledgeable employment law attorney.

Types of Adverse Actions

Adverse actions are any negative employment actions that an employer takes against an employee in response to their protected activity, such as making a good faith complaint or reporting illegal conduct. Adverse actions can take many forms and can be direct or indirect. Some common forms of adverse actions include termination, demotion, reduction in pay, negative performance reviews, exclusion from important meetings, denial of promotions, reassignment to a less desirable position, and others.

However, it is important to note that adverse actions can also include more subtle forms of retaliation, such as exclusion from social events or informal gatherings, being assigned to less desirable work, or receiving fewer work assignments or responsibilities. These less direct forms of retaliation can be just as detrimental to an employee as more overt actions, and employers who engage in such retaliation can be held liable under the law. It is important to remember that for an action to be considered adverse, it must be more than just an inconvenience or annoyance. The action must be one that would dissuade a reasonable employee from engaging in protected activity. This means that an action that has no effect on an employee’s job, such as a mild rebuke or a minor change in work schedule, may not be considered adverse.

Employees who believe they have been subject to adverse actions as a result of making a good faith complaint or engaging in other protected activity may have legal recourse under federal and state laws. If an employer retaliates against an employee for making a good faith complaint, the employee may be entitled to reinstatement, back pay, and other damages. It is important for employees to understand their rights and protections under the law and to seek legal advice if they believe they have been retaliated against.

Damages

Damages are an important aspect of retaliation claims, as they provide financial compensation for employees who have suffered harm as a result of their employer’s retaliation. Damages can include lost wages, emotional distress, and punitive damages. Lost wages are the most common form of damages and can include back pay, front pay, and future lost earnings. Back pay compensates the employee for the wages they would have earned had they not been retaliated against, while front pay compensates the employee for future wages they are likely to lose as a result of the retaliation. Emotional distress damages are another form of damages that can be awarded in retaliation claims. These damages compensate the employee for the emotional harm they have suffered as a result of the retaliation. Emotional distress damages may include compensation for anxiety, depression, humiliation, and other emotional injuries.

Punitive damages may also be available in some retaliation cases. Punitive damages are designed to punish the employer for their wrongful conduct and deter them and others from engaging in similar behavior in the future. Punitive damages are only available in cases where the employer’s conduct was particularly egregious or willful, and where compensatory damages alone are not sufficient to deter the employer from engaging in similar behavior in the future. The amount of damages in a retaliation case depends on the specific circumstances of the case. Factors that may be considered in determining damages include the severity of the retaliation, the length of time the employee was retaliated against, the employee’s emotional distress, and the employer’s conduct.

Statute of Limitations

Statute of limitations is a legal time limit that sets a deadline for filing a lawsuit or other legal action. The time limit varies depending on the type of case and the jurisdiction in which the case is being filed. In the context of employment retaliation claims, the statute of limitations determines how long an employee has to file a complaint or lawsuit after experiencing retaliation.

Statutes of limitations are critical in employment retaliation claims because they serve as a mechanism to ensure that claims are brought in a timely manner, while evidence and memories are still fresh. If an employee fails to file a claim within the statute of limitations period, they may lose their right to bring a claim at all. The time limits for filing an employment retaliation claim vary depending on the law under which the claim is brought. In general, it is critical for employees who believe they have been retaliated against to act quickly and seek legal advice as soon as possible. An experienced employment law attorney can help the employee understand their legal rights and the applicable statute of limitations, and can help them navigate the complex legal process of bringing an employment retaliation claim.

In summary, the statute of limitations is a legal time limit that sets a deadline for filing a lawsuit or other legal action. In the context of employment retaliation claims, the statute of limitations determines how long an employee has to file a complaint or lawsuit after experiencing retaliation. The time limits for filing an employment retaliation claim vary depending on the law under which the claim is brought, and failure to meet the deadline may result in the employee losing their right to pursue a claim. Therefore, it is critical for employees to seek legal advice as soon as possible if they believe they have been retaliated against.

Dovetailing with Other Laws Retaliation

Claims can dovetail with other laws, such as those related to discrimination, harassment, and workers’ compensation. For example, an employee who reports sexual harassment and is subsequently terminated may have claims for both retaliation and sexual harassment. Employees who believe they have been subjected to retaliation in violation of another law should seek the assistance of a knowledgeable employment law attorney to determine their legal rights and potential remedies.

Whistleblowing

Whistleblowing is a type of protected activity that occurs when an employee reports unlawful conduct, including violations of laws or regulations, to a supervisor, a government agency, or the public. Whistleblowers are protected by law from retaliation, and employers who retaliate against whistleblowers can be subject to penalties, including monetary damages and injunctive relief. Whistleblowing can be a complex and risky process, and employees who are considering blowing the whistle should seek the advice of an experienced employment law attorney.

“Unless specifically articulated in our Legal Services in Agreement, MKO disclaims representation on Whisteblower (among other things) matters.” This means that MKO Employment Law LLC does not provide legal representation or advice on the specific legal matters covered in the article unless it is explicitly stated in the firm’s legal services agreement. While the article provides general information on the topics of retaliation and whistleblowing, the law in this area can be complex, strategically asserted or not, nuanced, and each case is fact-specific. Therefore, readers are advised to consult with a licensed attorney to obtain legal advice and representation regarding their specific situation.

Common Retaliation Claims

Employment retaliation claims can take many different forms, but some of the most commonly asserted claims include age discrimination, disability discrimination and medical issues in the workplace, EEOC/PHRC claims, FMLA gender/orientation discrimination including sexual harassment and pregnancy, wrongful termination and constructive termination/constructive discharge, workers’ compensation retaliation, and whistleblowing.

Age discrimination claims arise when an employee is subjected to adverse employment actions, such as termination, demotion, or denial of a promotion, based on their age. The Age Discrimination in Employment Act (ADEA) prohibits employment discrimination against individuals who are 40 years of age or older. If an employee is retaliated against for making a good faith complaint of age discrimination or for participating in an investigation or proceeding related to age discrimination, they may have a retaliation claim.

Disability discrimination and medical issues in the workplace claims arise when an employee is subjected to adverse employment actions based on their disability or medical condition. The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) prohibits employment discrimination against individuals with disabilities, and the Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA) provides certain employees with the right to take leave for medical reasons. If an employee is retaliated against for exercising their rights under the ADA or FMLA, they may have a retaliation claim.

EEOC/PHRC claims arise when an employee files a complaint of discrimination or harassment with the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) or the Pennsylvania Human Relations Commission (PHRC). If an employee is retaliated against for making such a complaint or for participating in an investigation or proceeding related to the complaint, they may have a retaliation claim.

FMLA gender/orientation discrimination including sexual harassment and pregnancy claims arise when an employee is subjected to adverse employment actions based on their gender, sexual orientation, or pregnancy. The FMLA, for example. provides certain employees with the right to take leave for pregnancy-related medical conditions and for the birth or adoption of a child. If an employee is retaliated against for exercising their rights under the FMLA or for making a good faith complaint of gender/orientation discrimination or sexual harassment, they may have a retaliation claim.

Wrongful termination and constructive termination/constructive discharge claims arise when an employee is terminated or resigns as a result of intolerable working conditions. Workers’ compensation retaliation claims arise when an employee is subjected to adverse employment actions, such as termination or demotion, as a result of filing a workers’ compensation claim. Whistleblowing claims arise when an employee reports illegal activity, such as fraud or other violations of law, by their employer. If an employee is terminated or forced to resign as a result of making a good faith complaint of illegal activity, they may have a retaliation claim.

Overall, these are some of the most common types of employment retaliation claims that employees may assert. It is important for employees to understand their rights and protections under the law and to seek legal advice if they believe they have been retaliated against.

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Examples of Retaliation

  1. Termination. An employer may terminate an employee who has engaged in protected activities, such as reporting discrimination or harassment.
  2. Demotion. An employer may demote an employee who has engaged in protected activities, such as requesting an accommodation for a disability.
  3. Reduction in Pay. An employer may reduce an employee’s pay as retaliation for engaging in protected activities, such as filing a complaint with the EEOC.
  4. Harassment. An employer may subject an employee to harassment as retaliation for engaging in protected activities, such as reporting workplace safety violations.
  5. Negative Performance Reviews. An employer may give an employee negative performance reviews as retaliation for engaging in protected activities, such as reporting age discrimination.
  6. Excluding from Important Meetings. An employer may exclude an employee from important meetings as retaliation for engaging in protected activities, such as reporting sexual harassment.
  7. Denying Promotions. An employer may deny an employee promotions as retaliation for engaging in protected activities, such as reporting discrimination.
  8. Reassignment to a Less Desirable Position. An employer may reassign an employee to a less desirable position as retaliation for engaging in protected activities, such as requesting an accommodation for a disability.
  9. Sudden Change in Job Duties. An employer may suddenly change an employee’s job duties as retaliation for engaging in protected activities, such as reporting wage and hour violations.
  10. Intimidation. An employer may intimidate an employee as retaliation for engaging in protected activities, such as reporting safety violations.
  11. Shunning. An employer may shun an employee as retaliation for engaging in protected activities, such as reporting discrimination.
  12. Public Criticism. An employer may publicly criticize an employee as retaliation for engaging in protected activities, such as reporting harassment.
  13. Gossip. An employer may spread gossip about an employee as retaliation for engaging in protected activities, such as reporting discrimination.
  14. Threats. An employer may threaten an employee as retaliation for engaging in protected activities, such as reporting safety violations.
  15. Physical or Verbal Abuse. An employer may physically or verbally abuse an employee as retaliation for engaging in protected activities, such as reporting environmental violations.
  16. Sabotage. An employer may sabotage an employee’s work as retaliation for engaging in protected activities, such as reporting financial fraud.
  17. Blacklisting. An employer may blacklist an employee as retaliation for engaging in protected activities, such as reporting wage and hour violations.
  18. Negative References. An employer may give negative references as retaliation for engaging in protected activities, such as filing a complaint with the EEOC.
  19. Denial of Training or Education Opportunities. An employer may deny an employee training or education opportunities as retaliation for engaging in protected activities, such as reporting harassment.
  20. Unwarranted Disciplinary Action. An employer may give an employee unwarranted disciplinary action as retaliation for engaging in protected activities, such as requesting an accommodation for a disability.
  21. Withholding Necessary Equipment or Materials. An employer may withhold necessary equipment or materials as retaliation for engaging in protected activities, such as reporting environmental violations.
  22. Forced Resignation. An employer may force an employee to resign as retaliation for engaging in protected activities, such as reporting discrimination.
  23. Undermining Authority. An employer may undermine an employee’s authority as retaliation for engaging in protected activities, such as reporting harassment.
  24. Overloading with Work. An employer may overload an employee with work as retaliation for engaging in protected activities, such as reporting wage and hour violations.
  25. Interference with Personal Life. An employer may interfere with an employee’s personal life as retaliation for engaging in protected activities, such as reporting discrimination.
  26. Delayed or Denied Pay Raises. An employer may delay or deny pay raises as retaliation for engaging in protected activities, such as filing a complaint with the EEOC.
  27. Assigning Undesirable Work. An employer may assign undesirable work as retaliation for engaging in protected activities, such as reporting safety violations.
  28. Forcing Overtime. An employer may force an employee to work overtime as retaliation for engaging in protected activities, such as reporting harassment.
  29. Altering Job Description. An employer may alter an employee’s job description as retaliation for engaging in protected activities, such as requesting an accommodation for a disability.
  30. Denial of Benefits. An employer may deny an employee benefits as retaliation for engaging in protected activities, such as reporting wage and hour violations.
  31. Tampering with Personal Property. An employer may tamper with an employee’s personal property as retaliation for engaging in protected activities, such as reporting environmental violations.
  32. Denial of Unemployment Benefits. An employer may contest an employee’s unemployment benefits as retaliation for engaging in protected activities, such as filing a complaint with the EEOC. In rare cases this may even be protected.
  33. Bribes. An employer may offer bribes to employees to discourage them from engaging in protected activities, such as reporting financial fraud.
  34. False Accusations. An employer may make false accusations against an employee as retaliation for engaging in protected activities, such as reporting discrimination.
  35. Disrespectful Behavior. An employer may show disrespectful behavior towards an employee as retaliation for engaging in protected activities, such as reporting safety violations.
  36. Undermining the Employee’s Credibility. An employer may undermine an employee’s credibility as retaliation for engaging in protected activities, such as reporting wage and hour violations.
  37. Bullying. An employer may bully an employee as retaliation for engaging in protected activities, such as reporting harassment.
  38. Isolating an Employee. An employer may isolate an employee as retaliation for engaging in protected activities, such as reporting environmental violations.
  39. Spreading False Rumors. An employer may spread false rumors about an employee as retaliation for engaging in protected activities, such as filing a complaint with the EEOC.
  40. Forcing an Employee to Sign an Unreasonable Agreement. An employer may force an employee to sign an unreasonable agreement as retaliation for engaging in protected activities, such as reporting discrimination.
  41. Unwarranted Change. in Schedule An employer may make an unwarranted change in an employee’s schedule as retaliation for engaging in protected activities, such as reporting safety violations.
  42. Delaying Promotion. An employer may delay promoting an employee as retaliation for engaging in protected activities, such as reporting environmental violations.
  43. Understaffing. An employer may understaff as retaliation for engaging in protected activities, such as filing a complaint with the EEOC.
  44. Denying an Employee Reasonable Accommodation. An employer may deny an employee a reasonable accommodation as retaliation for engaging in protected activities, such as reporting harassment.
  45. Discharging an Employee for Insubordination. An employer may discharge an employee for insubordination as retaliation for engaging in protected activities, such as requesting an accommodation for a disability.
  46. Disparaging Remarks. An employer may make disparaging remarks about an employee as retaliation for engaging in protected activities, such as reporting discrimination.
  47. Falsely Accusing an Employee of Wrongdoing. An employer may falsely accuse an employee of wrongdoing as retaliation for engaging in protected activities, such as reporting wage and hour violations.
  48. Withholding Information. An employer may withhold information from an employee as retaliation for engaging in protected activities, such as reporting environmental violations.
  49. Withholding Bonuses or Incentives. An employer may withhold bonuses or incentives as retaliation for engaging in protected activities, such as filing a complaint with the EEOC.
  50. Forcing an Employee to Retire. An employer may force an employee to retire as retaliation for engaging in protected activities, such as reporting harassment.

Retaliation in the workplace can take many forms, and it is important for employees to be aware of the different types of retaliation. Retaliation can occur in response to a wide range of protected activities, such as reporting discrimination, harassment, safety violations, wage and hour violations, and environmental violations. Employees who experience retaliation should seek legal counsel from a reputable law firm to determine their legal rights and potential legal remedies. MKO Employment Law LLC is a top law firm that can help employees who have experienced retaliation in the workplace. The firm has extensive experience representing employees in retaliation claims and is dedicated to helping employees obtain the justice they deserve. Here are 50 examples of Workplace Retaliation.

Remedies for Retaliation at Work

The legal remedies available to employees who prevail in a retaliation claim may vary depending on the facts of each individual case, and outcomes are not guaranteed. That being said, remedies are the legal means of compensation that employees may receive if they prevail in a retaliation claim. Remedies can include reinstatement, back pay, and injunctive relief. Reinstatement means that the employee is returned to their former position, with the same salary, benefits, and seniority as if they had never been retaliated against. Back pay is the amount of wages the employee would have earned had they not been subjected to retaliation. Injunctive relief is a court order requiring the employer to stop the retaliatory conduct.

In some cases, an employee may also be entitled to other forms of compensation, such as emotional distress damages and punitive damages. Emotional distress damages may be awarded to compensate the employee for the emotional harm they have suffered as a result of the retaliation, while punitive damages are designed to punish the employer for their wrongful conduct and deter them from engaging in similar behavior in the future.

Factors that may be considered in determining remedies include the severity of the retaliation, the length of time the employee was retaliated against, mitigation, and the employer’s conduct. If an employee believes they have been retaliated against, it is important for them to seek the assistance of a knowledgeable employment law attorney to determine the potential remedies in their case and to ensure that their legal rights are protected.

While it is possible for employees who prevail in a retaliation claim to receive significant financial compensation, it is important to note that outcomes are not guaranteed and may vary depending on the specific circumstances of the case. Therefore, readers should consult with a licensed attorney to obtain legal advice and representation regarding their specific situation.

Conclusion

In conclusion, retaliation is a serious problem in the workplace, and can take many forms. Employees who engage in protected activities, such as reporting discrimination, harassment, safety violations, and other illegal or unethical conduct, are protected by law from retaliation. However, proving retaliation can be difficult, and employees who believe they have been retaliated against should seek the assistance of a knowledgeable employment law attorney.

MKO Employment Law LLC is a top law firm that can help employees who have experienced retaliation in the workplace. The firm has extensive experience representing employees in retaliation claims, and is dedicated to helping employees obtain the justice they deserve. MKO Employment Law LLC understands the complex legal issues surrounding retaliation claims, and can help employees navigate the legal process to obtain the best possible outcome.

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MKO is a “boutique firm” which means that we focus on a niche area and offer highly specialized services to clients who are looking for the personal touch within our area of expertise: Employment Law. Boutique law firms are not a general practice or one-stop legal shop, and that’s a good thing. You need one good attorney who knows the ins and outs of the area of law that’s relevant to your case. Look for a law firm that primarily practices the area of law that you need. If that’s all they do, chances are, they do it very well. We see each legal dispute as an opportunity to find a fair and equitable resolution without destroying your reputation, resume, job prospects, income, and if avoidable, not subjecting you, your family, friends, and former coworkers to unnecessary, highly invasive, time consuming, stressful, and ultimately public litigation. MKO, “Providing you a path forward in your life, career, and recovering the compensation you deserve.™” Confidentiality is key, for everyone. Are you a victim? MKO’s employment lawyers are always available for the clients. You can contact us anytime for a case assessment and evaluation. 

Ten Reasons You Want MKO As Your Employment Counsel

1. Focused Employment Law Practice

MKO is a “boutique law firm” which means that we concentrate on this niche area and offer highly focused employment law services to clients who are looking for the personal touch. Boutique law firms are not a one-stop legal shop, and that’s a good thing. While a long roster of diverse legal services may look impressive on paper, it’s fairly pointless in practice. You need one good attorney who knows the ins and outs of the area of law that’s relevant to your case.  Look for a law firm that only practices in the area of law that you need. If that’s all they do, chances are, they do it very well.

2. Technology Driven & Experts in the Cloud

We provide immediate legal consultations, operate a paperless law firm, use advanced cloud storage, digital signatures, electronic forms, and can review your documents using screen share technology instantaneously. MKO is technologically savvy, nimble, flexible, and efficient. 

We are not confined to our office, chained to a desktop computer, or burdened with IT maintenance. Thanks to the smart use of technology we can focus on providing our clients with the best representation possible. By streamlining our practice we can focus on what our clients hire us to do – advocate on their behalf and work diligently toward a desired result.

3. Legal Advice Instantly From The Comfort of Home

MKO can provide superior legal services through adaptive use of new technology and provide the majority of legal assistance while you are comfortably working from your home. It just also happens it's better, easier, and faster for our clients - they really appreciate it. We seamlessly and interactively collaborate with you in a relaxed environment where you have all of your files in your immediate control. We find this is the absolute best way to provide legal advice to our clients on complex legal issues, hands down.

The old style of coming into our office with binders of disjointed and unsearchable paperwork, of which we to organize and figure out on the fly, is incredibly wasteful, time-consuming, inefficient, and not highly productive. Because of our integration with technology, we are ready to work with you on highly intricate matters on a moments notice, no matter where you (or we) are.

4. Discreet When Necessary

While many cases require that we go to court to seek justice, there are a substantial number of disputes that need to be handled discreetly. We see each legal dispute as an opportunity to find a fair and equitable resolution without destroying your reputation, resume, job prospects, income, and if avoidable, not subjecting you, your family, friends, and former coworkers to unnecessary, highly invasive, time consuming, stressful, and ultimately public litigation. MKO, “Providing you a path forward in your life, career, and recovering the compensation you deserve.™”

Confidentiality is key, for everyone. 

5. Experience, Professional, & Integrity

Through representing and managing thousands of employment situations, rest assured there is help or a path forward for your situation. For example, Partner Christi Wallace has personally represented over 1000 clients and has managed hundreds more for associates that worked for her in just her first 10 years!

6. Highly Responsive Attorneys

We always get the question, "If I choose to have you represent me, will it be difficult for me to get in touch with you?"

Absolutely not, we even make ourselves available to clients beyond our normal business hours! Further, when you call us your attorney answers, not a secretary who puts you on hold for 20 minutes, then tells you that you can leave a voicemail for your attorney. Besides the MKO office phone number, our clients can contact their attorney via mobileSMS & textingbusiness email, and an urgent emergency email. For example, we can often respond to a text message in just a few minutes. Experience a better, faster, and more efficient way to work with an attorney. MKO believes that clients can and should depend on the fact that we’ll respond quickly.

7. Attorneys Available 74+ Hours Per Week

Employment Attorneys are available at least 74 hours per week by phone, email, and text messaging. Don't be fooled by marketing, many law firms are using non-attorney 3rd party answering services and advertising "Phones Answered 24 Hours A Day, 7 Days A Week." We pick up our own phones, respond to our own emails and text messages, and use real attorneys, 74+ hours per week. 

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8. Practical Advice From Seasoned Professionals

MKO strongly believes that every situation is distinctly unique and therefore we must endeavor to find the right solution for that particular issue. Because we are a boutique employment law firm, we strive to find unique and innovation solutions for our clients in every circumstance. We take action when necessary, put together deals when possible, and work with our clients so we can be creative and find smart solutions instead of needless litigation. We want to protect your interests now and in the future.

9. Contingency Representation

Contingency Legal Representation is where you do not have to pay your lawyer up front. This is fantastic if you are offered this option. Lawyers and litigation costs are incredibly expensive if you pay hourly. With contingency representation, you are not faced with large legal bills and expenses that are daunting and causes slow downs while waiting for a retainer to be replenished. Further, when you're offering to pay anyone up front and hourly, it seems they'll take almost any case - so long as they are getting paid. Funny how that works. Here's how we help:

  • People can afford an attorney. – Without the benefit of contingency, it would be very difficult for a person who was recently separated from their job to afford an employment lawyer.
  • MKO only gets paid if there is a recovery.  – We put our money where our mouth is, if we don't get a recovery, you don't owe legal fees and costs.
  • Contingency representation says something about your case. – Considering MKO only will get paid if there is a recovery, you can assume we like to cases that we believe have merit.
  • Helps people can move on with their lives – Instead of racking up debt to pay for legal help, our contingency representation lets you move on with your life as we deal with the legal stuff. This is exactly what MKO stands for, “Providing you a path forward in your life, career, and recovering the compensation you deserve.™"
10. Keeping Costs Low To Focus On Your Case

Our clients understand that their representation is are far more important than an expensive address. Some law firms might be battling an extremely burdensome and large cost overhead. In other words, to survive, they may need to be a "factory firm" or "volume practice" that needs to process a vast amount of cases to be able to afford their superfluous costs, expenses, and overheadWe aggressively keep costs down so we can focus on you.

Don't want to be treated like an account number, a settlement figure, or a wheel that needs to be turned to keep the law firm getting paid? We keep our costs low and use this financial freedom for our clients best interests.

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Wrongful Termination

We help people fired, or soon to be fired, when they have been treated unfairly, illegally, or unjustly.

Employment Discrimination

Race, religion, gender (including pregnancy, childbirth, and related medical conditions), orientation, disability.

Professional Exit Strategies

Remove yourself from a toxic workplace or help with a job loss. Lawyers give you an exit strategy.

Medical Accommodations

Employees needing physical or mental health/wellness accommodations are protected.

Disability Discrimination

Many health conditions can be considered disabilities and are  legally protected including retaliation.  

EEOC or PHRC Agencies

Aggressive lawyering in the state and federal agencies can mean quick, quiet, and lucrative resolutions.

Age Discrimination

For those over 40 years old (but older is preferred) that experience bias based on your age.

Sexual Harassment

A range of actions from mild transgressions to sexual abuse or sexual assault. A highly serious offense.

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To Ask During Your Free Lawyer Consultation

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  • =Can a employment attorney really help my case, even if I still work there?

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